Trail Planning and Design

 

  • Accommodating Bicycle and Pedestrian Travel: A Recommended Approach: Accommodating Bicycle and Pedestrian Travel: A Recommended Approach is a policy statement adopted by the United States Department of Transportation. USDOT hopes that public agencies, professional associations, advocacy groups, and others adopt this approach as a way of committing themselves to integrating bicycling and walking into the transportation mainstream.
  • Bikability Checklist: The Bikeability Checklist can help you find the answer. Inside you’ll find insightful questions, allowing you to evaluate your neighborhood’s bikeability. In addition to the questions, the Checklist provides both immediate answers and long-term solutions to your neighborhood’s potential problems.
  • Blue Trails GuideThe Blue Trails Guide is a comprehensive web site that covers planning, building, managing, and promoting water trails. It also includes information on safety issues and case studies, as well as a list of additional resources.
  • Chesapeake Water Trails: A VisionThe vision for Chesapeake water trails, articulated by knowledgeable and experienced water trail advocates in combination with the Framework formulated by Chesapeake Bay Program Partners, will establish a blueprint for the emerging network of water trails.
  • Context Sensitive Solutions: Context sensitive solutions (CSS) is a collaborative interdisciplinary approach to developing transportation projects. Under CSS, MDOT solicits dialogue with local governments, road commissions, industry groups, land use advocates, and state agencies early in a project’s planning phase.
  • Design Essentials for Active Communities: Active living environments are places where all people are able and inspired to use their feet to get them places. They are places where people of all ages, incomes and abilities can walk and bike-both for recreation and for transportation.
  • Designing for the Future: A presentation from Trail Link 2003 on the Rhode Island DOT Bicycle Transportation User Survey.
  • Developing and Implementing Projects: Understanding the issues and opportunities: An introductory presentation on greenway issues, including what they are, how they are designed, who to involve, creating a steering committee, the planning process, and potential partnerships.
  • Genesee County Regional Trail Plan: Support for building a regional trail system in Genesee County has grown over the last few years and it was found that the County lacked a united guiding plan and vision for creating a trail system that connects urban, suburban and rural communities.
  • Getting Involved: A Community Trail Handbook for Landowners: This includes an overview of how the Hudson River Trail System was created as well as case studies of easement opportunities in other areas.
  • ITC Pedestrian Walkway and Bike Path Development Procedures: ITC developed a corporate policy that is intended to encourage municipal developments of our corridors (rights of way) for bicycle and pedestrian paths. The following provides an overview of the pedestrian walkway and bike path development procedures.
  • Logistical Lasting Launches: Design guidance for canoe and kayak launches.
  • MDOT Project Life Cycle: The following is a table showing the project life cycle for road projects in Michigan. It defines the pre-construction steps, the years before construction, and what room there is for changing the project.
  • Meridian Township: Policies for a Pedestrian/Bicycle Pathways System: The purpose of the pedestrian/bicycle pathway system is to provide a network of interconnected pathways throughout Meridian Township to allow for safe, energy efficient, and convenient nonmotorized travel, as well as, an aesthetically pleasing outlet for jogging, walking and recreational bicycle riding.
  • Michigan DNR Trail Crossing Easement LanguageMichigan DNR’s crossing easement language for adjacent property owners to be able to regularly cross trail property.
  • Michigan Recreational Use Statute and the Private Landowner: The Michigan legislature has enacted a Recreational Use Statute to encourage owners and managers to allow public access for recreation use on their lands.
  • MUTCD: Traffic Control for Bicycle Facilities: Chapter 9 from the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) covers traffic control for bicycling facilities, including signage, pavement markings, and more.
  • Pavilion Specifications: The following are suggestions for the pavilion design. They are certainly NOT all of the specifications and some may not be applicable.
  • Pedestrian & Bicycle Roadway Design Safe, Smart and Defendable: A presentation by Josh DeBruyn (MDOT) and Ronald Emery (Department of Attorney General) at the Designing Healthy Livable Communities Conference.
  • Reasons for Highway Shoulders and Urban Bike Lanes: The following reasons are what the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials has to say about the benefits of shoulders in three important areas: safety, capacity and maintenance.
  • Report: St. Clair County Nonmotorized Guidelines: The goal of the St. Clair County Non-motorized Guidelines is to develop an approach to accommodating bicycling, walking and other non-motorized modes of travel on and across MDOT’s trunkline system in St. Clair County. While the focus is on MDOT ‘s system in St. Clair County, this document has been prepared with the consideration that it may be utilized by other MDOT offices as well as county and local road agencies throughout the state.
  • Selecting Roadway Design Treatments to Accommodate BicyclesSelection Guidelines.
  • Southern Links Rail Trail Easement Agreement: Attached is a sample easement agreement for the Southern Links rail-trail in Michigan.
  • St. Clair Non-Motorized Guidelines Map: Inventory of existing and proposed non-motorized facilities.
  • Stream Crossings: Trails from a River’s Point of View: Provides design and management guidance for trails that cross rivers and streams.
  • Tables for Selecting Roadway Design Treatments: Gives usable width lengths for pathways based on the urban environment and traffic speeds.
  • The Trailway Development Process: A presentation which gives an overview of the trail development process, including determining a trail route and vision, advocacy, as well as acquisition and development considerations.
  • Trail Design and Construction: Building better asphalt trailsDesign and construction guidelines for asphalt trails.
  • Trail Development: Acquisition, Construction & Management: Discusses trail development details related to acquisition of land and funds, trail construction and management.
  • Trails and Greenways: An Acquisition Primer: This presentation discusses the process of land acquisition.
  • Trailway Types: The following definitions and cross-sectional details are provided to clarify trail design treatments proposed for various segments of the project.
  • Traits of Successful Water Trails: An outline for developing and managing successful water trails from the National Park Service’s Rivers and Trails Program. The outline covers physical support as well as organizational support.
  • Water Trail Toolbox: Provided are the step-by-step guidelines-the ABCs of planning, building, and managing a water trail. Each of the three sections has a brief opening page and a list of links that examine the subjects in greater detail. The additional resources include supporting background information.
  • Working with Trail Opponents: You can take various approaches when working with people who may oppose your rail-trail project In general, you should always stress the benefits of rail-trails and keep adjacent landowners involved in the process. Here are 10 techniques you may find helpful.